Learning Through Storytelling: Parkland, FL

To be completely honest with you, the reader, I was anxious when I was tasked with writing this post. The goal was to share my thoughts on a story told by Lorena Sanabria. Lorena is currently a thoughtful, sharp, and poised high school junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Of course, that school is forever known in our collective consciousness as “Parkland.” The anxiety I felt manifested itself as self-doubt: what of value can I even bring to this conversation? I decided the best way to recount Lorena’s story was through the reactions of the people listening to it.

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The National School Walkout

As students across the nation prepare to walk out of schools on March 14, we stand ready to receive their message.  Regardless of your school’s position on the issue, a responsibility we all share as stewards of the student community is to provide what support we can to ensure that everyone remains safe.  Whether you are walking out alongside them or simply bearing witness, there are a few things to keep in mind.

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Lockdown Door Devices: What Are Your Options?

There are many devices on the market that can increase security in a lockdown situation. Finding the right solution for your campus will take research and thought, and it is our recommendation to have your campus door locks assessed to find the best solution. For now, start your search for information with this article!

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Hawaii's False Alarm: What Schools Can Learn

If you live in Hawaii, last weekend you experienced quite a scare… Maybe if you live anywhere. As many of you know there was a false alarm sent out through the emergency notification system that the state of Hawaii uses to warn residents of possible threats or emergencies. 

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Who's Your Incident Commander?

Woah, that’s a new term. Let’s start at the beginning:

The Incident Command System is a program developed to manage emergencies and most importantly, communication, actions and order/direction during emergencies. When FEMA and Department of Homeland Security think about “Incidents”, they’re thinking big picture and little picture (if I can use that expression?). They think about governmental response to large scale emergencies like earthquakes, forest fires and hurricanes and they also think about single community responses to smaller scale or more isolated emergencies.

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Emergency Preparedness and the New Year by Andrew Barrett-Weiss

The last month of the year has so many meanings for different communities. In business, it is often a time to set goals and financials for the coming year. In schools, it is a time for first semester exams and planning for the new semester beginning after the holiday break. In the Christian Calendar, this is known as the season of Advent, a time of “expectant waiting and preparation.”

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“How will your team be prepared when ‘the big one’ hits?”

That’s a question we get a lot about our emergency line.

First, some context:

Being a responsible partner in safety, means having a process in place for each school, business or event to gain emergency support when they need it. To that end, Joffe has an established 24 hour emergency line devoted to helping schools, businesses and events who are actively experiencing emergencies work through them.

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“They Live Their Lives in the PM”

 

I was sitting in a meeting the other day and the subject turned to everyone’s worst nightmare – an emergency after school. A client – who shall remain nameless unless he chooses to comment on this blog post – said “they live their lives in the PM”. And it’s a story we all know, too well.

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Emergency Preparedness in the Home

As September comes to an end, it wraps up with National Preparedness Month. This is a national campaign dealing with an actual disaster. Visit their webpage which lays out steps for preparedness success that can be implemented any time of the year. For many, the safety practice continues into October, with the Great Shake Out, an international earthquake drill which started in Southern California in 2008 and has since grown to include nearly 20 million people, and counting, worldwide this year!

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What do you think is the most dangerous thing Americans do each day?

Based on national statistics, approximately 30,000 people will die in vehicular accidents this year, with many of those accidents involving teenage drivers. Auto accidents are the leading cause of death amongst 15-20 year olds.

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